Podcasts

Podcasts from the Galton Institute’s annual conferences at The Royal Society in 2019 and 2018.   There are two podcasts  for each speaker the first is a highlights video and the second is an audio podcast of the whole interview.


2019 conference: New Light on Old Britons

Investigating the earliest humans in Europe - Professor Nick Ashton

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode, Georgia Mills talks to Professor Nick Ashton, an archaeologist at the British Museum, about investigating the earliest humans in Europe.

Video highlights from Nick Ashton's audio podcast

Ancient DNA and the changing structure of the prehistoric British population - Professor Ian Barnes and Dr Selina Brace

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode Georgia Mills talks to Professor Ian Barnes and Dr Selina Brace, ancient DNA researchers at the Natural History Museum, about the ancient DNA of the British population from the Mesolithic to the Bronze Age.

Video highlights from Ian and Selina’s audio podcast

The First Britons: bones and behaviour - Dr Silvia Bello

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode Georgia Mills talks to Dr Silvia Bello, from the Natural History Museum, about human behaviour in the last million years.

Video highlights from Silvia Bello's audio podcast

The genetic structure of the populations of the British Isles - Professor Sir Walter Bodmer, FRS

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode Georgia Mills talks to Professor Sir Walter Bodmer from the Weatherall Institute, Oxford about the genetic structure and origins of populations of the British Isles.

Video highlights from Walter Bodmer’s audio podcast

The genomic history of Ireland - Dr Lara Cassidy

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode Georgia Mills talks to Dr Lara Cassidy from Trinity College Dublin about the genomic history of Ireland.

Video highlights from Lara Cassidy’s audio podcast

The 'Celts' in Britain - a romantic fiction? - Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe, CBE, FBA

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode Georgia Mills talks to Professor Sir Barry Cunliffe about the ‘Celts’ in Britain.

Video highlights from Barry Cunliffe’s audio podcast

Genetics and history: how DNA can be used as a window onto the past - Professor Turi King

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference New Light on Old Britons, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2019. In this episode Georgia Mills talks to Professor Turi King of the University of Leicester about the secrets of the Y chromosome and how the remains of Richard III were identified.

Video highlights from Turi King’s audio podcast

2018 Conference: Genome Editing

The ethics of genome editing in human reproduction - Professor Richard Ashcroft

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference on genome editing, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2018. In this episode, Martha Henriques talks to Richard Ashcroft, Professor of Bioethics at Queen Mary University of London about the most pressing ethical concerns facing the field of genome editing in human reproduction.

Richard Ashcroft’s highlights video podcast

Why use gene editing technologies? - Professor Austin Burt

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference on genome editing, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2018. In this episode, Martha Henriques talks to Austin Burt, Professor of Evolutionary Genetics at Imperial College London, to find out how genome editing could be used to control the mosquitoes that transmit malaria. But given that tools like mosquito nets, antimalarial drugs and insecticides are already available, why do we need to start using gene editing technologies at all?

Austin Burt’s highlights video podcast

Genome editing techniques - Professor Robin Lovell-Badge

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference on genome editing, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2018. In this episode, Martha Henriques talks to Robin Lovell-Badge from the Francis Crick Institute in London, who’s using genome editing techniques to tease apart the regulatory elements, or control switches, within DNA that turn genes on at the right time and in the right place to make all the different parts of the body, particularly focusing on the switches that create crucial sex differences between males and females.

Robin Lovell-Badge’s highlights video podcast

Gene Editing - Professor Emma Morris

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference on genome editing, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2018. In this episode, Martha Henriques talks to gene therapy specialist Professor Emma Morris, from the UCL Institute of Immunity and Transplantation and the Royal Free Hospital, London. Emma explains how gene editing is being used in an exciting new type of cancer treatment, known as immunotherapy, and looks ahead to some of the other promising approaches coming down the pipeline.

Emma Morris’s highlights video podcast

Genome editing in human embryos - Dr Kathy Niakan

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference on genome editing, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2018. In this episode, Martha Henriques talks to Kathy Niakan, from the Francis Crick Institute in London, who is studying the very earliest stages of human development and was the first person in the UK to be granted a licence by the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority to carry out genome editing in early stage human embryos. But why was it necessary?

Kathy Niakan’s highlights video podcast

Genome editing crops - Professor Dan Voytas

This podcast was recorded at the Galton Institute conference on genome editing, held at the Royal Society in London in October 2018. In this episode, Martha Henriques talks to Professor Dan Voytas, director of the Centre for Precision Plant Genomics at the University of Minnesota in the US. He and his team developed the first genome-edited crop that is likely to enter the human food chain, and told Martha the scientific story behind its creation.

Dan Voytas’s highlights video podcast